The Power of Product Information: II

Last week, I wrote about how rich and deep product information can help anyone selling products craft descriptions faster. Instead of having to search the Web for different instances of the product and collecting bits and pieces of information from different sources, having all the product information consolidated in one central universal product database makes writing higher-quality descriptions way more efficient. Let’s look at another use case today – enriching product listing content to boost discoverability and conversion on your website or app.

There are categories that lend themselves more to certain product information details than others. For instance, home and kitchen, or apparel. In such categories, attributes like size, dimensions, specifications help a consumer make their purchase decision with more confidence, especially when buying online. For the seller, it is important to provide as much information as possible in order to minimize the number of returns. So, richer product information helps everyone!

World-Imports-Turin-Collection-2-Light-Wall-Sconce-L13906467I was playing in our API and came across this gorgeous lighting sconce which returned a high number of attributes and classification details. This is a very rich level of data providing the brand name, the collection within the brand, model no., UPC, along with dimensions, materials, electrical requirements, bulb types, etc.


table2I looked up the product and found many online sellers that were carrying it. It’s interesting the level of detail that retailers choose to go into. One retailer lists the critical information about dimensions and specifications, but fails to make the description very enticing.


Another retailer has a skillfully written description, but no specs and dimensions.


This is a red flag and creates hesitation in the world of online retail. If a consumer finds exact dimensions on another website, you can be assured that that’s where the conversion will occur. And there are a lot of other details here that some consumers may care about – like voltage, safety listings, or energy certifications. The goal is not to send consumers off to another website looking for that information. If they find it elsewhere, that’s where they will convert.

The trick is to have a very comprehensive listing that has an enticing description as well as technical specifications and details. A lifestyle product such as this which costs north of $150 requires a retailer to almost lure a consumer into the experience that it is offering. There’s probably not going to be a consumer that looks specifically for this particular sconce. A consumer will have different attributes in mind like type of light, fabric, finish etc. Is the product listing nuanced enough to support that kind of a search once a consumer is on your website? When it comes to product listing content, the devil is definitely in the details.

This post is a part of our Product Bite series.

  Download the Pervasive Commerce White Paper

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *